SHOWCASES

The HYPE model has been used in several environmental assessments and is also incorporated in various user-oriented tools. Here we show some examples of HYPE usefulness in specific user oriented projects.

FANFAR project

World-wide HYPE forecasts are currently tested in operational warning production for west Africa, where SMHI leads an initiative to implement an operational service shared by 17 countries. Flooding is a rapidly growing concern in the region that often it leads to the loss of human lives, livestock, crops and damages to infrastructure. Annual flood is blessing for flood-dependent agriculture, but only if the planting is synchronised to the upcoming flood. The region would benefit from a reliable access to operational flood forecasts and alerts produced by a solid information and communication technology adapted to regional conditions operated by West African institutions. The project FANFAR (Grant No 780118) is implementing this to enhance the regional capacity of West Africa to forecast, alert for and manage floods.

VISIT SITE: FANFAR

Results from the models E-HYPE and World-Wide HYPE are used in operational climate services. SMHI have produced open data on seasonal forecasts and climate impacts in three contacts to the Climate Data Store of ECMWF, who operates the C3S on behalf of the European Union. The proof-of-concept for a Service for Water Indicators in Climate Change Adaptation (C3S_441_Lot1_SMHI) illustrates important components for a service at the European scale, while the Global users in the Copernicus Climate Change Services (C3S_422_Lot1_SMHI) show the global impacts and user up-take in 19 case-studies worldwide.
In a current contract (C3S_424_Lot1_SMHI) we develop an operational service for the European water sector.

VISIT SITES: GLOBAL USERS IN THE COPERNICUS CLIMATE CHANGE SERVICE | WATER INDICATORS IN CLIMATE CHANGE ADAPTATION | OPERATIONAL SERVICE FOR THE WATER SECTOR

aquaclew imprex clara

Several HYPE applications are used as demonstrators in on-going research and development projects to train users and collect feedback on existing services. Some examples are given below:

  • The interactive maps and graphs from Hypeweb for climate change in Europe are used by European collaborative project AQUACLEW (ERA4CS Grant 690462), to improve the co-creation process, data tailoring and evaluation metrics when developing climate services. AQUACLEW brings together nine organisations from across Europe. Take a guided tour HERE and give us feedback for co-design!
  • The seasonal forecasts from Hypeweb are used by the EU H2020 projects IMPREX (Grant No 641811) and CLARA (Grant No 730482) when communicating usefulness and skills of seasonal forecasts with users. IMPREX brings together 23 partners from 9 countries and CLARA 10 partners from across Europe. Train your forecast-based decision-making with the Call For Water Game.

VISIT SITES: AQUACLEW USER GUIDANCE AND FEEDBACK | IMPREX SEASONAL RISK OUTLOOK |CLARA CALL FOR WATER GAME

Case Study nutrient tool

Historical HYPE data of long-term means for Europe for nutrient load on water bodies are used to assess source apportionment of pollution from various sectors. Eutrophication is a major water quality problem in Europe and this analysis and scenario tool was developed for authorities of inland waters to better optimise their measure programmes. The European tool was developed in the EU FP7 SWITCH-ON project (grant No 603587) and a similar tool is frequently used by the Swedish water authorities, linked to the Swedish HYPE model.
Read more in Strömbäck et al. (2019) https://doi.org/10.1016/j.envsoft.2018.07.012

VISIT SITES: SWITCH-ON | EU NUTRIENT TOOL | SWEDISH NUTRIENT TOOL

Case study of nutrient inflow baltic sea

The HYPE climate-change impact data for Europe has been further refined to assess the impact of various scenarios, combining the effects of societal evolution and measure programmes for nutrient reduction in the Baltic Sea. The Baltic is suffering from eutrophication and surrounding countries have agreed on collaborative efforts so save the sea. Several research projects have used the HYPE data to explore and communicate results with policy makers in the region. The results presented here were produced (2018) with funding from BONUS, the joint Baltic Sea research and development programme (Art 185) and national research councils, through SOILS2SEA and MIRACLE projects, each one embracing 5-10 research institutes in the region.

VISIT SITE: NUTRIENT INFLOW TO THE BALTIC SEA

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